_“As a child, I had my own photo album full of photos showing my own image. That something happened based on the photos in my photo album that I considered my memory was very odd. I can recall entire episodes only with the help of these photos in addition to the stories that go along with them – as if I never took part in them myself“ (Jörg Sasse).
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From the very beginning, the relationship between photography and reality, the construction of memory and the manipulability of reality via photography was a determining factor in the works of Jörg Sasse, who has long been one of the most important and influential photographers from the Becher class in Düsseldorf. Mindful of the maze of latent pictorial traps and interpretations, the artist is primarily interested in preserving the photographic image's specific visual logic. The beauty and mysteriousness of his images are sustained by an amazing ability to distill constellations from the myriad potential of possible images that seem open and legible but are nevertheless persistently concerned with the unremitting astonishment regarding the domineering nature of the visual. As opposed to many of his colleagues from the Becher School like Thomas Ruff, Candida Höfer and Thomas Struth, Jörg Sasse abstains entirely from the principle of seriality and creates solely unique pieces.

An archive comprising tens of thousands of his own as well as amateur photographs serves the artist as a collecting point of pictorial possibilities that can still be unfolded into any direction. Searching for a “completely genuine present“ (Sasse), the split second that includes all the banality and uniqueness of the moment, the artist transforms his source material into preliminary “sketches” with largely only minor interventions. However, only ten to fifteen of these sketches are actually realized as completed images each year. Sasse has created a body of work since the early 1980s with a suggestive strength that directly results from the universal visual desires to which he signed on. They are images that hit the nail on the head because they intentionally miss everything that is of central important, relate about the moments in which conventional connections are abandoned und push themselves into the void of the non-event in place of the familiar context. Finally, they are extraordinarily beautiful pictures that come nowhere close to be point where they can be accused of being kitschy. Their beauty lies in the impossibly of resolving them narratively or logically.

Organized in cooperation with the Kunstmuseum Bonn, the exhibition will show primarily recent works from the last few years in addition to a large convolute of Sasse's “sketches”, which are of fundamental importance for his oeuvre. Schirmer & Mosel will publish a comprehensive catalog.